Cry Heart But Never Break

We all need inspirational reminders of how to handle pain and loss.

There are a number of stories, as quiet and as brilliant as gemstones peeking from the ground, that deal with the momentous themes of mortality, the meaning of life, and the meaning of death.”

— Dr. Linda Miles

UNITED STATES, December 30, 2020 /EINPresswire.com/ — As this year comes to a close, we all need inspirational reminders of how to handle pain and loss. There are a number of stories, as quiet and as brilliant as gemstones peeking from the ground, that deal with the momentous themes of mortality, the meaning of life, and the meaning of death. Some of the most powerful and poignant of these are found in children’s books.

One such riveting tale was written by Danish author Glenn Ringtved, illustrated by Charlotte Pardi, and translated to English by Robert Moulthrop. It is stirringly entitled: Cry, Heart, But Never Break.

The story tells of Death’s house call to four small children who live with their grandmother, whom they love very much and who is dying. In the story, Death is portrayed as a remarkably tender and empathetic character, who leaves his scythe at the door to not frighten the children, who compassionately accepts their invitation for coffee because the children believe that this will delay and deter him from his mission, and who seems genuinely heartbroken by the duty he must do. To brace them for the reality of their grandmother’s impending departure, Death shares a story with the four children, trying to give them hope by revealing a different way of seeing things. Death’s story is about two brothers—named Sorrow and Grief—who lived in a dark valley and “never saw through the shadows on the tops of the hills” … until they met and fell in love with two sisters, aptly named Joy and Delight. Perfectly balanced, with the respective boys and girls completing each other, these two couples reenact the theme of essential balance in the universe: day and night, health and sickness, sun and rain, life and death, and so forth. This narrative is Death’s way of gently reminding the children that death itself helps us appreciate and enjoy life. It is a cycle and a balance. When the children head upstairs and realize their grandmother has died, Death whispers: “Cry, heart, but never break. Let your tears of grief and sadness help begin new life.”

Dr. Linda Miles, is a highly regarded psychotherapist with over 30 years experience. Her book The New Marriage, Transcending the Happily Ever After Myth was a finalist for the Forward Book of the Year Award. She has written many articles for professionals and published in national magazines such as Parents and Entrepreneur. Follow her on Twitter at drlinda03. Visit [http://www.mindfulnessrewrites.com] for more information.

Dr. Linda Miles
Miles and Associates
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